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After Blizzard, Some Composure on Campus and Beyond

Boston Public Schools remained closed for a third consecutive day following blizzard-baddie Juno. Notably, they were joined by Scituate Public as cleanup there is ongoing and homeowners continue to assess the damage and community. More than a few homes in Scituate and Marshfield were destroyed when seawalls were breached by hurricane-force winds, waves and rising tides.

Snow covered benches outside St. Ann's Resident Hall.

Snow covered benches outside St. Ann’s Resident Hall.

Area colleges and universities held classes on Thursday, including Emmanuel. The Facilities Department was commended by students online for their work clearing walkways and digging out resident halls. Others wanted another day off.

Around the neighborhood, traffic was just as appalling as ever, only minimally beset by tall snow hills and newly unfamiliar street geography. Crosswalks in some areas were still inaccessible as of Thursday afternoon and ice was a concern for pedestrians who walked with caution near Symphony Hall.

A snow-covered crosswalk near Northeastern University forces pedestrians to walk through it or into the street.

A snow-covered crosswalk near Northeastern University forces pedestrians to walk through an ankle deep drift or into the street.

At Star Market , Help Desk attendant Teisha said that shopping had resumed almost immediately. “The crowd is sturdy, but it’s not busy today,” she said. The store was closed for the duration of the blizzard, which she felt indifferent towards. “I couldn’t make it here for the storm. I wish we were open, then.”

A man evaluates the recently cleared sidewalk near Symphony Hall.

A man evaluates the sidewalk near Symphony Hall.

Emmanuel’s IT department was also busy during “The Blizzard of 2015”. The department announced last week that it had implemented a new direct connection between Netflix and the school’s general internet service to ease traffic speeds, which were certainly strained during the two day most students spent hunkered down. Brahim Bouchaiba, a network administrator, said in an e-mail that “in general, we have never seen nor generated as much traffic as we did during Juno.” According to Bouchaiba, Emmanuel’s bandwidth was under immense pressure throughout the duration of the storm. “There was big spike in all internet traffic,” he said, “but to be specific, Netflix, gaming sites and social media were the champs.” Providing the graphic below to illustrate the spike in traffic, Bouchaiba noted that during the storm there was never a recorded outage in internet service.

A major spike in internet traffic at Emmanuel occured during the peak hours of the blizzard, from January 27th to 29th. Internet traffic among all connections during Juno was  considered unprecedented by Emmanuel's IT department.

A major spike in internet traffic at Emmanuel occurred during the peak hours of the blizzard, from January 27th to 29th. Internet traffic among all connections during Juno was so great that it was considered unprecedented by Emmanuel’s IT department.

Light snow is also expected to impact the commute on Friday morning, though total snowfall will only amount to an inch or so. The Northeast is bracing for more snow next week, which could place additional strains on municipalities still recovering from Juno’s blitz.

Paul Rowley ’16 is a Staff Writer and Columnist for The Hub. Follow him on Twitter @almanacalism or e-mail him rowleyp@emmanuel.edu.

Posted by on January 30, 2015. Filed under Around Campus,Around the Hub. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.